Journal Article

Clinical Features of Clostridial Bacteremia: A Review from a Rural Area

Paula M. Rechner, William A. Agger, Kathy Mruz and Thomas H. Cogbill

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 33, issue 3, pages 349-353
Published in print August 2001 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online August 2001 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/321883
Clinical Features of Clostridial Bacteremia: A Review from a Rural Area

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Blood samples, which were obtained from patients who lived in a rural area with ∼500 acute-care hospital beds, were cultured from 1990 through 1997. We retrospectively reviewed the blood cultures that yielded Clostridium species (74 [0.12%] of 63,296 cultures). These were obtained from 46 different hospitalized patients (incidents per hospital, 0.03%). The source of the Clostridium species was a gastrointestinal site in 24 patients (52.2%). The most frequently identified Clostridium species was Clostridium perfringens (in 10 [21.7%] of patients), followed by Clostridium septicum (in 9 [19.6%]). Thirty-one patients (67.4%) were aged ⩾65 years, 13 patients (28.3%) had diabetes mellitus, and underlying malignancy was present in 22 patients (47.8%). The mortality rate of patients whose condition had been managed surgically was 33%; for those patients whose conditions required medical management, the mortality rate was 58%. Clostridium bacteremia in these patients usually had a gastrointestinal source, it often occurred in patients with serious underlying medical conditions, and it rarely was the result of traumatic farm accidents.

Journal Article.  2642 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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