Journal Article

Initial Virological and Immunologic Response to Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy Predicts Long-Term Clinical Outcome

Christina M. Kitchen, Scott G. Kitchen, Jeffrey A. Dubin and Michael S. Gottlieb

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 33, issue 4, pages 466-472
Published in print August 2001 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online August 2001 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/321900
Initial Virological and Immunologic Response to Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy Predicts Long-Term Clinical Outcome

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Immunology
  • Public Health and Epidemiology
  • Microbiology

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

Little is known about the long-term clinical outcomes for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients who have received highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Determining factors associated with long-term clinical outcomes early in the course of treatment may allow modifications to be made for patients who are at a greater risk of treatment failure. To evaluate these factors, we studied 213 HIV-infected patients who had received HAART for at least 115 weeks. In the univariate analysis, virological response, which was measured as the change in virus load from baseline at month 3 of treatment, was the single best predictor of clinical outcome (relative hazard, 0.722; P = .001), independent of virological suppression. In the multivariate analysis, virological response and immunologic response, which was measured as an increase in CD4 cell count of >200 cells/mm3, resulted in better prediction of clinical outcomes than did use of either variable alone (P = .02). Our results indicate that changes in virus load and immunologic response together are good predictors of clinical outcome and can be assessed after the initiation of HAART, which would allow clinicians to identify patients early in the course of therapy who are at greater risk of negative outcome.

Journal Article.  4434 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.