Journal Article

Rubella Seropositivity in the United States, 1988–1994

Clare A. Dykewicz, Deanna Kruszon-Moran, Geraldine M. McQuillan, Walter W. Williams, Frederik P. L. Van Loon, Cindy Cossen, Bagher Forghani and Stephen C. Hadler

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 33, issue 8, pages 1279-1286
Published in print October 2001 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online October 2001 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1086/322651
Rubella Seropositivity in the United States, 1988–1994

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Data obtained in the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III), conducted during 1988–1994, were analyzed to determine the epidemiology of rubella seropositivity in the United States, including risk factors for low rubella seropositivity. Serological samples obtained from NHANES III study participants ⩾6 years of age were tested for rubella IgG antibodies. “Rubella seropositivity” was defined as serum rubella IgG antibody level ⩾10 IU by enzyme immunoassay. Overall, rubella seropositivity rates in the United States were 92% in persons aged 6–11 years, 83% in persons aged 12–19 years, 85% in persons aged 20–29 years, 89% in persons aged 30–39 years, and ⩾93% in persons aged ⩾40 years. The lowest rate (78%) of any United States birth cohort of the 20th century occurred among persons born from 1970–1974. Eliminating rubella and chronic rubella syndrome in the United States will require international efforts, including vaccination of preschool- and school-age children and all susceptible young adults.

Journal Article.  4573 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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