Journal Article

Molecular Analysis of Coagulase-Negative <i>Staphylococcus</i> Isolates from Blood Cultures: Prevalence of Genotypic Variation and Polyclonal Bacteremia

Mamta Sharma, Kathleen Riederer, Leonard B. Johnson and Riad Khatib

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 33, issue 8, pages 1317-1323
Published in print October 2001 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online October 2001 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/322673
Molecular Analysis of Coagulase-Negative Staphylococcus Isolates from Blood Cultures: Prevalence of Genotypic Variation and Polyclonal Bacteremia

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Fifty-seven coagulase-negative Staphylococcus isolates from 22 inpatients who had ⩾2 blood cultures that were positive for Staphylococcus within 24 hours were analyzed to determine the frequency of polyclonal bacteremia. Patients were considered to have bacteremia (14 patients) or contamination of sample (8 patients) on the basis of clinical criteria. Nine colonies were randomly selected from each blood culture and genotyped by means of SmaI digestion/pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Relatedness was determined by calculation of the Dice coefficient of banding-pattern similarity (SAB). Analysis of bacteremic isolates demonstrated the presence of a single species in 35 of 41 blood cultures, 1 related variant in 5 blood cultures (87%–92% SAB), and an unrelated strain in 1 blood culture (79% SAB). Analysis of contaminated samples demonstrated the presence of a single strain in 10 of 16 blood cultures and 1–3 variants (28%–97% SAB) in the remainder. Genotype diversity was significantly more common in the contaminated samples (P = .036). Almost all coagulase-negative Staphylococcus bacteremias were monoclonal.

Journal Article.  3611 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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