Journal Article

Influence of Maternal Antibodies on Neonatal Immunization against Respiratory Viruses

Bruce Gellin, John F. Modlin and James E. Crowe

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 33, issue 10, pages 1720-1727
Published in print November 2001 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online November 2001 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/322971
Influence of Maternal Antibodies on Neonatal Immunization against Respiratory Viruses

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Immunology
  • Public Health and Epidemiology
  • Microbiology

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

Vaccines that successfully prevent severe infant respiratory virus diseases should induce protection at a very young age because of the low age of patients who are hospitalized owing to these viruses. Candidate respiratory virus vaccines are being tested in infants who are naïve to infection but seropositive to the viral agents because they possess maternal IgG antibodies (Abs). Transplacental maternal Abs may be partially protective against disease caused by respiratory virus infections. Carefully conducted studies have shown that these Abs can also profoundly suppress or enhance infant immune responses to immunization. The mechanisms underlying regulation of immune responses to viruses by maternal Abs are under investigation. This article explores the current knowledge regarding the effect of maternal Abs on respiratory virus and measles virus immunization, and it reviews the current approaches to overcoming Ab-mediated immunosuppression.

Journal Article.  6530 words. 

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.