Journal Article

The Effect of Statins on Mortality in Patients with Bacteremia

A. P. Liappis, V. L. Kan, C.G. Rochester and G.L. Simon

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 33, issue 8, pages 1352-1357
Published in print October 2001 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online October 2001 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/323334
The Effect of Statins on Mortality in Patients with Bacteremia

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The statins, inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, act to regulate the biosynthesis of cholesterol. Statins also deplete nonsterol cholesterol precursors, the isoprenoids, which are necessary for prenylation of critical membrane proteins that regulate cellular communication, including the inflammatory response. In a retrospective review of 388 bacteremic infections due to aerobic gram-negative bacilli and Staphylococcus aureus, there was a significant reduction in both overall (6% vs. 28%; P = .002) and attributable (3% vs. 20%; P = .010) mortality among patients taking statins compared with patients not taking statins. This reduction in mortality persisted in a multivariate analysis (odds ratio, 7.6; 95% confidence interval, 1.01–57.5). Among the statin group, diabetes, hypertension, and coronary artery disease were more prevalent (P < .001), and there were more skin and soft tissue infections identified as sources of bacteremia (P = .008). These data suggest a potential clinical role of statins in bacteremic infection; however, the mechanism by which mortality is reduced remains undefined.

Journal Article.  2498 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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