Journal Article

Association of Human Herpesvirus 6 Reactivation with Severe Cytomegalovirus-Associated Disease in Orthotopic Liver Transplant Recipients

Jeffrey A. DesJardin, Eunhui Cho, Stacey Supran, Laurie Gibbons, Barbara G. Werner and David R. Snydman

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 33, issue 8, pages 1358-1362
Published in print October 2001 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online October 2001 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/323336
Association of Human Herpesvirus 6 Reactivation with Severe Cytomegalovirus-Associated Disease in Orthotopic Liver Transplant Recipients

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To explore the possible interaction between human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) and cytomegalovirus (CMV) in patients who have undergone organ transplantation, stored serum samples from 139 orthotopic liver transplant recipients were tested for HHV-6 immunoglobulin (Ig) G and IgM antibodies. HHV-6 reactivation occurred in 87 patients (62.6%) and was associated with CMV disease (P = .01), severe CMV-associated disease (P = .01), older age (P = .005), and use of muromonab-CD3 (Orthoclone; Orthobiotech) as treatment for rejection (P = .02). Trends for an association between HHV-6 reactivation and invasive fungal disease (P = .12), bacteremia (P = .10), and graft loss (P = .12) were seen. In a multivariate analysis of risk factors for severe CMV-associated disease, HHV-6 reactivation (relative risk [RR], 3.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.2–10.2; P = .02), CMV donor-positive-recipient-negative match (RR, 5.7; 95% CI, 2.5–13.2; P < .001), and elevated serum creatinine level (P < .0001) were independent predictors. HHV-6 reactivation is associated with severe CMV-associated disease in liver transplant recipients.

Journal Article.  2402 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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