Journal Article

Ineffectiveness of Intranasal Zinc Gluconate for Prevention of Experimental Rhinovirus Colds

B. Turner Ronald

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 33, issue 11, pages 1865-1870
Published in print December 2001 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online December 2001 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/324347
Ineffectiveness of Intranasal Zinc Gluconate for Prevention of Experimental Rhinovirus Colds

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Zinc has generally been administered by the oral route in studies of prevention or treatment of the common cold. The purpose of these studies was to evaluate the effectiveness of intranasal zinc gluconate for prevention of experimental rhinovirus infection and illness. Ninety-one volunteers, 41 treated with active medication and 50 treated with placebo, received study medication for 3 days, were inoculated with rhinovirus, and then were treated with study medication for an additional 6 days. Rhinovirus infection was documented in 37 (74%) of the 50 placebo-treated volunteers and in 32 (78%) of the 41 volunteers treated with active medication. Zinc treatment had no effect on total symptom score, rhinorrhea, nasal obstruction, or the proportion of infected volunteers who developed clinical colds. These data do not support a role for intranasal zinc gluconate for prevention or treatment of the common cold.

Journal Article.  3887 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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