Journal Article

Acquired Disorders of Phagocyte function Complicating Medical and Surgical Illnesses

Georg Engelich, Daniel G. Wright and Kevan L. Hartshorn

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 33, issue 12, pages 2040-2048
Published in print December 2001 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online December 2001 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/324502
Acquired Disorders of Phagocyte function Complicating Medical and Surgical Illnesses

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There is evidence that acquired dysfunction of neutrophils, monocytes, or macrophages is an important cause of infection in patients with diabetes mellitus, renal or hepatic failure, alcoholism, autoimmune diseases, influenza or human immunodeficiency virus infection, burns, and trauma. Distinguishable mechanisms of acquired phagocyte dysfunction include inhibitory effects of metabolic disturbances (e.g., hyperglycemia, uremia), chemical toxins (e.g., ethanol), viral proteins on phagocyte activation, and pathologic activation of phagocytes in the circulation (e.g., after hemodialysis, burns, or cardiopulmonary bypass). Although the burden of morbidity and mortality resulting from acquired phagocyte dysfunction appears to be vast, research in this area has been hampered by the complexity of the underlying illnesses and by limitations of laboratory assays and clinical study methodology. Given the advent of improved assays of phagocyte functions and treatments that can enhance these functions, there is a pressing need for more prospective studies of acquired phagocyte dysfunction.

Journal Article.  5913 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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