Journal Article

Extension of the Lancefield Classification for Group A Streptococci by Addition of 22 New M Protein Gene Sequence Types from Clinical Isolates: <i>emm103</i> to <i>emm124</i>

Richard F. Facklam, Diana R. Martin, Lovgren Marguerite, R. Johnson Dwight, Androulla Efstratiou, Terry A. Thompson, Sonia Gowan, Paula Kriz, Gregory J. Tyrrell, Edward Kaplan and Bernard Beall

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 34, issue 1, pages 28-38
Published in print January 2002 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online January 2002 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/324621
Extension of the Lancefield Classification for Group A Streptococci by Addition of 22 New M Protein Gene Sequence Types from Clinical Isolates: emm103 to emm124

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Classic M protein serotyping has been invaluable during the past 60 years for the determination of relationships between different group A streptococci (GAS) strains and the varied clinical manifestations inflicted by these organisms worldwide. Nonetheless, during the past 20 years, the difficulties of continued expansion of the serology-based Lancefield classification scheme for GAS have become increasingly apparent. By use of a less demanding sequence-based methodology that closely adheres to previously established strain criteria while being predictive of known M protein serotypes, we recently added types emm94emm102 to the Lancefield scheme. Continued expansion by the addition of types emm103 to emm124 are now proposed. As with types emm94emm102, each of these new emm types was represented by multiple independent isolates recovered from serious disease manifestations, each was M protein nontypeable with all typing sera stocks available to international GAS reference laboratories, and each demonstrated antiphagocytic properties in vitro by multiplying in normal human blood.

Journal Article.  5681 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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