Journal Article

Higher Occurrence of Hepatotoxicity and Rash in Patients Treated with Oxacillin, Compared with Those Treated with Nafcillin and Other Commonly Used Antimicrobials

Nizar F. Maraqa, Margarita M. Gomez, Mobeen H. Rathore and Ana M. Alvarez

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 34, issue 1, pages 50-54
Published in print January 2002 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online January 2002 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/338047
Higher Occurrence of Hepatotoxicity and Rash in Patients Treated with Oxacillin, Compared with Those Treated with Nafcillin and Other Commonly Used Antimicrobials

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This study compared adverse drug reactions (ADRs) to oxacillin with those to nafcillin and other antibiotics. We reviewed the medical records of 222 children receiving outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT) from February 1995 through June 1999. The diagnosis, antibiotics used, ADRs, action taken, and patient demographics were recorded. The most common ADRs were neutropenia (9.8%), rash (8.5%), and hepatotoxicity (3.8%). ADRs occurred more frequently in the oxacillin group (58.5%) than in the nafcillin group (29.3%; P = .004), the clindamycin group (12.5%; P > .001) and the “other” antibiotics group (14.4%; P > .001). Hepatotoxicity and rash occurred more frequently in the oxacillin group (22% and 31.7%, respectively) than in the nafcillin group (0% [P > .001] and 10.3% [P = .008]), the clindamycin group (1.4% [P > .001] and 8.3% [P = .001]), and the other antibiotics group (1.4% [P > .001] and 1.4% [P > .001]). On the basis of this retrospective analysis, oxacillin use in children was associated with a higher incidence of hepatotoxicity and rash, compared with the use of nafcillin and other intravenous antimicrobials.

Journal Article.  2540 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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