Journal Article

The Molecular Epidemiology of Penicillin-Resistant <i>Streptococcus pneumoniae</i> in the United States, 1994–2000

S. S. Richter, K. P. Heilmann, S. L. Coffman, H. K. Huynh, A. B. Brueggemann, M. A. Pfaller and G. V. Doern

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 34, issue 3, pages 330-339
Published in print February 2002 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online February 2002 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/338065
The Molecular Epidemiology of Penicillin-Resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae in the United States, 1994–2000

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The genetic relatedness of 672 penicillin-resistant isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae (PRSP) recovered during national surveillance studies conducted in the United States during the periods of 1994–1995, 1997–1998, and 1999–2000 was determined by use of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Overall, 104 different PFGE types were elucidated. For all study periods combined, the 12 most prevalent PFGE types included >75% of all isolates, and 5 types were closely related to widespread clones (Spain23F-1, France9V-3, Spain6B-2, Tennessee23F-4, and Taiwan19F-14). From 1994–1995 to 1999–2000, 3 major PFGE types (not closely related to 16 recognized clones) increased in prevalence. Multidrug resistance was identified among 96%–100% of the isolates in 9 of 12 predominant PFGE types. The prevalence of erythromycin resistance increased within 4 major PFGE types. These observations support the hypothesis that the dominant factor in the emergence of PRSP in the United States during the 1990s has been human-to-human spread of relatively few clonal groups that harbor resistance determinants to multiple classes of antibiotics.

Journal Article.  5480 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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