Journal Article

Exercise Stress Testing for Detection of Silent Myocardial Ischemia in Human Immunodeficiency Virus—Infected Patients Receiving Antiretroviral Therapy

M. Duong, Y. Cottin, L. Piroth, A. Fargeot, I. Lhuiller, M. Bobillier, M. Grappin, M. Buisson, M. Zeller, P. Chavanet, J. E. Wolf and H. Portier

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 34, issue 4, pages 523-528
Published in print February 2002 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online February 2002 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/338398
Exercise Stress Testing for Detection of Silent Myocardial Ischemia in Human Immunodeficiency Virus—Infected Patients Receiving Antiretroviral Therapy

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The prevalence of silent myocardial ischemia (SMI) and the factors associated with SMI were evaluated in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) who had been receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for ⩾12 months and did not have known coronary artery disease or cardiac symptoms. Patients prospectively underwent exercise stress testing. The prevalence of SMI was 11% (11 of 99 patients). Patients who had SMI were significantly older than were patients who did not (mean ± SD, 51 ± 8 years vs. 42 ± 9 years; P = 0.001) and were more likely to have trunk obesity (54% of patients vs. 17%; P = .004). A significant correlation was found between a positive exercise test result and obesity (correlation, .006), waist-to-hip ratio (.007), and glucose and cholesterol levels (.04; P = .03). In multivariate analysis, age, central fat accumulation, and cholesterol level were independent variables associated with the detection of SMI. Exercise testing might be recommended for patients with HIV who have central fat accumulation and hypercholesterolemia.

Journal Article.  3567 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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