Journal Article

An Epidemiological Investigation of a Sustained High Rate of Pediatric Parapneumonic Empyema: Risk Factors and Microbiological Associations

Carrie L. Byington, LaShonda Y. Spencer, Timothy A. Johnson, Andrew T. Pavia, Daniel Allen, Edward O. Mason, Sheldon Kaplan, Karen C. Carroll, Judy A. Daly, John C. Christenson and Matthew H. Samore

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 34, issue 4, pages 434-440
Published in print February 2002 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online February 2002 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/338460
An Epidemiological Investigation of a Sustained High Rate of Pediatric Parapneumonic Empyema: Risk Factors and Microbiological Associations

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We investigated the increasing incidence of pediatric empyema during the 1990s at Primary Children's Medical Center in Salt Lake City. Of 540 children hospitalized with community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CAP) who were discharged from 1 July 1993 through 1 July 1999, 153 (28.3%) had empyema. The annual population incidence of empyema increased during the study period from 1 to 5 cases per 100,000 population aged <19 years. Streptococcus pneumoniae was identified as the most common cause of CAP with or without empyema; serotype 1 accounted for 50% of the cases of pneumococcal empyema. Patients with empyema were more likely to be >3 years old, to have ⩾7 days of fever, to have varicella, and to have received antibiotics and ibuprofen before admission to the hospital, compared with patients without empyema (P < .0001 for each factor). The increasing incidence of empyema was associated with infection due to S. pneumoniae serotype 1, outpatient treatment with certain antibiotics, ibuprofen use, and varicella.

Journal Article.  4303 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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