Journal Article

Nosocomial Antibiotic Resistance in Multiple Gram-Negative Species: Experience at One Hospital with Squeezing the Resistance Balloon at Multiple Sites

James J. Rahal, Carl Urban and Sorana Segal-Maurer

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 34, issue 4, pages 499-503
Published in print February 2002 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online February 2002 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/338639
Nosocomial Antibiotic Resistance in Multiple Gram-Negative Species: Experience at One Hospital with Squeezing the Resistance Balloon at Multiple Sites

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Increased use of antibiotics has led to the isolation of multidrug-resistant bacteria, especially in intensive care units and long-term care facilities. Resistance in specific gram-negative bacteria, including Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, is of great concern, because a growing number of reports have documented mechanisms whereby these microorganisms have become resistant to all available antibacterial agents used in therapy. Reduction in the selection of these multidrug-resistant bacteria can be accomplished by a combination of several strategies. These include having an understanding of the genetics of both innate and acquired characteristics of bacteria; knowing resistance potentials for specific antibacterials; monitoring resistance trends in bacteria designated as problematic organisms within a particular institution on a routine basis; modifying antibiotic formularies when and where needed; creating institutional education programs; and enforcing strict infection-control practices. Strategies appropriate for primary prevention of nosocomial resistance may differ from those required for control of existing epidemic or endemic resistance.

Journal Article.  3014 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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