Journal Article

Role of Long-Term Nucleoside-Analogue Therapy in Lipodystrophy and Metabolic Disorders in Human Immunodeficiency Virus—Infected Patients

Geneviève Chêne, Emmanuelle Angelini, Laurent Cotte, Jean-Marie Lang, Philippe Morlat, Corinne Rancinan, Thierry May, Valérie Journot, François Raffi, Bernard Jarrousse, Michèle Grappin, Gérard Lepeu and Jean-Michel Molina

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 34, issue 5, pages 649-657
Published in print March 2002 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online March 2002 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/338811
Role of Long-Term Nucleoside-Analogue Therapy in Lipodystrophy and Metabolic Disorders in Human Immunodeficiency Virus—Infected Patients

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The role of nucleoside analogues (NAs) in lipodystrophy (LD) syndrome in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)—infected patients remains controversial. We studied the prevalence of LD in previously untreated patients randomized to receive different NA combinations (in the ALBI-ANRS 070 trial) for 6 months. At month 30 of follow-up, 37 (31%) of 120 patients had ≥1 morphologic change, and 21 (57%) of 37 had isolated peripheral lipoatrophy; corresponding values for the patients who received only NAs throughout follow-up were 20 (30%) of 66 and 14 (67%) of 21, respectively. In multivariate analysis, factors associated with presence of LD at month 30 were initial assignment to the group receiving stavudine and didanosine (odds ratio [OR], 6.7; P = .02), age (OR for being 10 years older, 3.6; P = .002), and HIV RNA level at month 30 (OR, 0.4; P = .007). No difference was observed in cholesterol and glucose levels as a function of any pattern of antiretroviral exposure. Exposure to stavudine and didanosine was associated with LD syndrome (predominantly lipoatrophy).

Journal Article.  5012 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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