Journal Article

Immunoglobulin A as a Serological Marker for the (Silent) Circulation of Poliovirus in an Inactivated Poliovirus–Vaccinated Population

Tineke Herremans, Tjeerd G. Kimman, Marina A. E. Conyn—van Spaendonck, Annemarie Buisman, Hester de Melker, Fritjofna Abbink, Paul Bijkerk and Marion P. G. Koopmans

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 34, issue 8, pages 1067-1075
Published in print April 2002 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online April 2002 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/339489
Immunoglobulin A as a Serological Marker for the (Silent) Circulation of Poliovirus in an Inactivated Poliovirus–Vaccinated Population

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Poliovirus-specific immunoglobulin A (IgA) is detected after infection with wild-type virus or vaccination with live attenuated oral poliovirus (OPV) but not after vaccination with inactivated poliovirus (IPV). We examined whether the presence of IgA in serum can be used as a marker for poliovirus circulation in IPV-vaccinated populations in The Netherlands. In seronegative persons challenged with OPV, the sensitivity of this marker was 76%–86%. Results from a serosurvey showed a high seroprevalence (63%–73%) of IgA in the population born before vaccination was introduced in The Netherlands, which reflects natural exposure. The start of the vaccination program in 1957 corresponded to a reduction in the IgA seroprevalence in both vaccinated (2.1%–4.5%) and nonvaccinated groups (8.3%–11.7%). The presence of IgA-positive persons in the population could largely be explained by the occurrence of episodes of proven poliovirus circulation. We propose to use the detection of poliovirus-specific IgA as a tool to monitor virus circulation in IPV-vaccinated and nonvaccinated populations, to aid the poliovirus eradication process.

Journal Article.  3930 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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