Journal Article

The Promise of Novel Technology for the Prevention of Intravascular Device—Related Bloodstream Infection. I. Pathogenesis and Short-Term Devices

Christopher J. Crnich and Dennis G. Maki

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 34, issue 9, pages 1232-1242
Published in print May 2002 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online May 2002 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1086/339863
The Promise of Novel Technology for the Prevention of Intravascular Device—Related Bloodstream Infection. I. Pathogenesis and Short-Term Devices

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Intravascular devices (IVDs) are widely used for vascular access but are associated with substantial risk of development of IVD-related bloodstream infection (BSI). The development of novel technologies, which are based on an understanding of pathogenesis, promises a quantum reduction in IVD-related infections in an era of growing nursing shortages. Infections of short-term IVDs (that is, those in place µ10 days), including peripheral venous catheters, noncuffed and nontunneled central venous catheters (CVCs), and arterial catheters, derive mainly from microorganisms colonizing the skin around the insertion site, which most often gain access extraluminally. More-effective cutaneous antiseptics, such as chlorhexidine, a chlorhexidine-impregnated sponge dressing, CVCs with an anti-infective coating, anti-infective CVC hubs, and novel needleless connectors, have all been shown to reduce the risk of IVD-related BSI in prospective randomized trials. The challenge for the future will be to identify new preventative technologies and to begin to adapt more widely those technologies already shown to be efficacious and cost-effective.

Journal Article.  7840 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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