Journal Article

The Role of Serum Antibodies in the Protection against Rotavirus Disease: An Overview

Baoming Jiang, Jon R. Gentsch and Roger I. Glass

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 34, issue 10, pages 1351-1361
Published in print May 2002 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online May 2002 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/340103
The Role of Serum Antibodies in the Protection against Rotavirus Disease: An Overview

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A critical observation in understanding immunity to rotavirus is that children infected with wild virus or vaccinated with oral live vaccines develop a humoral immune response and are protected against severe disease upon reinfection. Nevertheless, much controversy exists as to whether these serum antibodies are directly involved in protection or merely reflect recent infection, leaving the protective role to mucosal or cell-mediated immunity or to other as-yet-undefined mechanisms. We have reviewed data from a variety of studies in humans, including challenge experiments in adult volunteers, longitudinal studies of rotavirus infection in young children, and clinical trials of animal and animal-human reassortant rotavirus vaccines in infants. These data suggest that serum antibodies, if present at critical levels, are either protective themselves or are an important and powerful correlate of protection against rotavirus disease, even though other host effectors may play an important role as well.

Journal Article.  8263 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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