Journal Article

<i>Streptococcus agalactiae</i> Infective Endocarditis: Analysis of 30 Cases and Review of the Literature, 1962–1998

A. Sambola, J. M. Miro, M. P. Tornos, B. Almirante, A. Moreno-Torrico, M. Gurgui, E. Martinez, A. Del Rio, M. Azqueta, F. Marco and J. M. Gatell

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 34, issue 12, pages 1576-1584
Published in print June 2002 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online June 2002 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/340538
Streptococcus agalactiae Infective Endocarditis: Analysis of 30 Cases and Review of the Literature, 1962–1998

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We describe 30 cases (1.7%) of community-acquired penicillin-susceptible Streptococcus agalactiae endocarditis among 1771 episodes of endocarditis diagnosed in 4 Spanish hospitals from 1975 through 1998. Endocarditis affected a native valve (most often the mitral valve) in 25 cases (83%). Surgical valve replacement was performed for 12 patients (40%). Fourteen patients (47%) died. Mortality rates for patients with native and prosthetic valve endocarditis were 36% and 100%, respectively (P = .01). The mortality rate for native valve endocarditis decreased during the last 6 years of the study (from 61% in 1975–1992 to 8% in 1993–1998; P < .05). Additionally, 115 cases in the literature from 1962–1998 were reviewed. During 1980–1998, the percentage of patients who underwent cardiac surgery increased from 24% (in the previous period, 1962–1979) to 43% (P = .05) and the mortality rate decreased from 45% to 34% (P = NS). S. agalactiae is an uncommon cause of endocarditis with a high mortality rate, although the prognosis of native valve endocarditis has improved in recent years, probably because of an increased use of cardiac surgery.

Journal Article.  5224 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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