Journal Article

Nosocomial Spontaneous Bacterial Peritonitis and Bacteremia in Cirrhotic Patients: Impact of Isolate Type on Prognosis and Characteristics of Infection

Bernard Campillo, Jean-Philippe Richardet, Tuan Kheo and Catherine Dupeyron

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 35, issue 1, pages 1-10
Published in print July 2002 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online July 2002 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/340617
Nosocomial Spontaneous Bacterial Peritonitis and Bacteremia in Cirrhotic Patients: Impact of Isolate Type on Prognosis and Characteristics of Infection

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The characteristics of and prognosis for nosocomial spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) and bacteremia were examined in a prospective study that included data from 194 consecutive episodes of SBP and 119 episodes of bacteremia, 93.3% of which were nosocomial, in 200 hospitalized cirrhotic patients. Gram-positive pathogens were predominant (70% of the total) among isolates from nosocomial infections; the prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) was 24.8%. Nosocomial and staphylococcal infections were associated with a higher mortality rate than were community-acquired infections (P = .0255) and nonstaphylococcal infections (P < .001), respectively. In comparison with non-MRSA infections, MRSA infections were more likely to recur and occurred in a greater number of sites other than ascitic fluid and blood (P = .0004). Older age (P = .0048), higher Child-Pugh score (P = .0011), and infection with staphylococci (P = .0031) were independently associated with a higher mortality rate. The emergence of MRSA is important because of the recurrence and poor outcome associated with infection with such organisms.

Journal Article.  4355 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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