Journal Article

Validity of Self-Reporting of Episodes of External Genital Warts

D. J. Wiley, Stella Grosser, Karen Qi, Barbara R. Visscher, Karl Beutner, Steffanie A. Strathdee, Bridget Calhoun, Frank Palella and Roger Detels

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 35, issue 1, pages 39-45
Published in print July 2002 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online July 2002 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/340743
Validity of Self-Reporting of Episodes of External Genital Warts

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Immunology
  • Public Health and Epidemiology
  • Microbiology

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

To determine whether men are able to self-diagnose external genital warts (EGWs), we studied data from 1115 men with and without human immunodeficiency virus infection. Men were largely unable to accurately assess the presence of EGWs. Self-reporting of EGWs was not a sensitive tool; only 38% of men who had EGWs diagnosed by a trained examiner who used bright light and visual inspection also reported having them. When we controlled for other covariates in a multivariate model, men who had EGWs diagnosed by an examiner were 14 times less likely to show concordance between examiner findings and self-report than were men who did not have EGWs diagnosed by an examiner (odds ratio, 0.07; 95% confidence interval, 0.06–0.09). Self-diagnosis and self-assessment may not accurately reflect the presence of EGWs, and self-diagnosis should not be used in place of an examiner's findings for epidemiologic studies that seek to determine the cause of disease.

Journal Article.  4477 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.