Journal Article

The Impact of Novel Immunosuppressive Agents on Infections in Organ Transplant Recipients and the Interactions of These Agents with Antimicrobials

Shahid Husain and Nina Singh

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 35, issue 1, pages 53-61
Published in print July 2002 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online July 2002 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/340867
The Impact of Novel Immunosuppressive Agents on Infections in Organ Transplant Recipients and the Interactions of These Agents with Antimicrobials

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Several of the new immunosuppressive agents that are used to treat transplant recipients possess in vitro activity against specific pathogens, enhance the activity of antimicrobial agents, or have unique drug interactions with antimicrobial agents. Mycophenolate mofetil may have a protective effect against Pneumocystis carinii; it also enhances the activity of ganciclovir and has strong antiviral activity against human immunodeficiency virus type 1. High doses of mycophenolate mofetil have been associated with a higher frequency of tissue-invasive cytomegalovirus disease but not with asymptomatic cytomegalovirus infection. Rapamycin exhibits potent in vitro fungicidal activity against Cryptococcus neoformans and several pathogenic fungi in transplant recipients; however, it is not known whether its immunosuppressive effect in organ transplant recipients outweighs its antifungal activity. Recognition of the unique characteristics of these agents and the evolving spectrum of opportunistic infections has implications for the differential diagnosis, management, and prophylaxis of infections in organ transplant recipients in the modern immunosuppressive era.

Journal Article.  6134 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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