Journal Article

Prospective Study of Measles in Hospitalized, Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)—Infected and HIV—Uninfected Children in Zambia

William J. Moss, Mwaka Monze, Judith J. Ryon, Thomas C. Quinn, Diane E. Griffin and Felicity Cutts

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 35, issue 2, pages 189-196
Published in print July 2002 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online July 2002 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/341248
Prospective Study of Measles in Hospitalized, Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)—Infected and HIV—Uninfected Children in Zambia

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Measles in persons coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has been reported to be unusual in its presentation and frequently fatal. To determine the effect of HIV coinfection on the clinical features and outcome of measles, a prospective study of hospitalized children with measles was conducted between January 1998 and October 2000 in Lusaka, Zambia. One-sixth (17%) of 546 children hospitalized with laboratory-confirmed measles were coinfected with HIV. One-third of the HIV-infected children hospitalized with confirmed measles were <9 months old, compared with 23% of HIV-uninfected children (P = .03). Few differences in clinical manifestations, complications, or mortality were found between HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected children with measles. HIV-infected children constitute a significant proportion of children hospitalized with measles in countries with high HIV prevalence and are more likely to be younger than the age for routine measles immunization.

Journal Article.  3956 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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