Journal Article

Human Immunodeficiency Virus in Correctional Facilities: A Review

Kenneth H. Mayer, Anne Spaulding, Becky Stephenson, Grace Macalino, William Ruby, Jennifer G. Clarke and Timothy P. Flanigan

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 35, issue 3, pages 305-312
Published in print August 2002 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online August 2002 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/341418
Human Immunodeficiency Virus in Correctional Facilities: A Review

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It is estimated that up to one-fourth of the people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in the United States pass through a correctional facility each year. The majority of persons who enter a correctional facility today will return home in the near future. Most inmates with HIV infection acquire it in the outside community; prison does not seem to be an amplifying reservoir. How correctional health services deal with the HIV-infected person has important implications to the overall care of HIV-infected people in the community. Routine HIV testing is well accepted. Combination antiretroviral therapy has been associated with a reduction in mortality in prisons. A link between area HIV specialists and correctional health care providers is an important partnership for ensuring that HIV-infected patients have optimal care both inside prison and after release.

Journal Article.  5764 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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