Journal Article

The Role of Clostridial Toxins in the Pathogenesis of Gas Gangrene

Dennis L. Stevens and Amy E. Bryant

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 35, issue Supplement_1, pages S93-S100
Published in print September 2002 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online September 2002 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/341928
The Role of Clostridial Toxins in the Pathogenesis of Gas Gangrene

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Clostridium perfringens gas gangrene is, without a doubt, the most fulminant necrotizing infection that affects humans. In victims of traumatic injury, the infection can become well established in as little as 6–8 h, and the destruction of adjacent healthy muscle can progress several inches per hour despite appropriate antibiotic coverage. Shock and organ failure are present in 50% of patients and, among these, 40% die. Despite modern medical advances and intensive-care regimens, radical amputation remains the single best life-saving treatment. Over the past century, much has been learned about the pathogenesis of this disease, and novel therapies are on the horizon for patients with this devastating infection.

Journal Article.  4160 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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