Journal Article

Ciprofloxacin for the Treatment of Uncomplicated Gonorrhea Infection in Adolescents: Does the Benefit Outweigh the Risk?

Gale R. Burstein, Stuart M. Berman, Jeffery L. Blumer and John S. Moran

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 35, issue Supplement_2, pages S191-S199
Published in print October 2002 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online October 2002 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/342107
Ciprofloxacin for the Treatment of Uncomplicated Gonorrhea Infection in Adolescents: Does the Benefit Outweigh the Risk?

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Immunology
  • Public Health and Epidemiology
  • Microbiology

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

The highest rates of reported gonorrhea infections occur among adolescent females aged 15–19 years. Among the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)–recommended single-dose gonorrhea treatment regimens, ciprofloxacin, a fluoroquinolone antibiotic, is approximately half the cost of other CDC-recommended oral treatment regimens. Fluoroquinolone use in patients aged <18 years has been limited because of irreversible articular cartilage damage demonstrated in large, weight-bearing joints of young animals. We reviewed the medical literature to assess whether the risks of a single 500-mg dose of ciprofloxacin to treat uncomplicated gonorrhea infection in adolescents appears to outweigh the benefits. We found no reports of irreversible cartilage toxicity or age-associated adverse events in 5236 human children and adolescents (aged 5 days–24 years) treated with a total of 5486 courses of fluoroquinolones.

Journal Article.  4341 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.