Journal Article

Insights into SEN Virus Prevalence, Transmission, and Treatment in Community-Based Persons and Patients with Liver Disease Referred to a Liver Disease Unit

Steve G. Wong, Daniele Primi, Hiroshige Kojima, Alessandra Sottini, Antonio Giulivi, Manna Zhang, Julia Uhanova and Gerald Y. Minuk

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 35, issue 7, pages 789-795
Published in print October 2002 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online October 2002 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/342329
Insights into SEN Virus Prevalence, Transmission, and Treatment in Community-Based Persons and Patients with Liver Disease Referred to a Liver Disease Unit

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To document the prevalence and routes of transmission of SEN virus (SEN-V) in community-based individuals and patients referred to a liver disease unit, stored serum samples obtained from 160 Canadian Inuit and 140 patients with liver disease were tested for SEN-V DNA by polymerase chain reaction. In the community-based population, SEN-V was present in 57 (36%) of 160 persons. SEN-V—positive individuals tended to be younger and were more often male. Liver enzyme levels and serologic markers for hepatitis A and B viruses were similar in SEN-V—positive and SEN-V—negative individuals. SEN-V was present in 30 (21%) of the 140 patients with liver disease. Age, sex, risk factors for viral acquisition, prevalence of symptoms, and liver biochemical and histological findings were similar in SEN-V—positive and SEN-V—negative patients. These results indicate that SEN-V infection is a common viral infection in both healthy individuals and patients with chronic liver disease, that transmission likely occurs via nonparenteral routes, and that SEN-V infection is not associated with higher rates of or more-severe liver disease in persons with preexisting liver disease.

Journal Article.  3618 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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