Journal Article

Infectious Outbreaks Associated with Bivalve Shellfish Consumption: A Worldwide Perspective

Israel Potasman, Alona Paz and Majed Odeh

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 35, issue 8, pages 921-928
Published in print October 2002 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online October 2002 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/342330
Infectious Outbreaks Associated with Bivalve Shellfish Consumption: A Worldwide Perspective

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Outbreaks of shellfish-associated infection have been reported for more than a century. Since the early 1970s, the global consumption of shellfish has increased considerably—and with it, the reports of outbreaks of infection. Most of these reports have originated from the United States, but Europe and, to a lesser extent, Asia and Australia have also been represented. The majority of outbreaks have been linked to oysters, followed by clams and mussels. Hepatitis A virus caused the largest ever shellfish-associated outbreak, but caliciviruses have caused the highest number of outbreaks; Vibrio species lead the list of bacterial pathogens. The prognosis of shellfish-associated infections is generally good, except for outbreaks of Vibrio vulnificus infection, which have a mortality rate of up to 50% in vulnerable people. Conventional and molecular techniques should be applied to better identify the causative agents, thereby enabling more-targeted control measures in growing, harvesting, and shipping bivalves.

Journal Article.  5148 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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