Journal Article

<i>Clostridium difficile</i>-Associated Diarrhea: Epidemiological Data from Western Australia Associated with a Modified Antibiotic Policy

Claudia Thomas, Mark Stevenson, D. James Williamson and Thomas V. Riley

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 35, issue 12, pages 1457-1462
Published in print December 2002 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online December 2002 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/342691
Clostridium difficile-Associated Diarrhea: Epidemiological Data from Western Australia Associated with a Modified Antibiotic Policy

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The incidence of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD) has increased dramatically in hospitals worldwide during the past 2 decades. In Western Australia, this increase was most obvious during the 1980s, when there was also an increase in the use of third-generation cephalosporin antibiotics. A study of the epidemiology of CDAD and the use of third-generation cephalosporins during 1993–2000 was undertaken. From 1993 through 1998, the incidence of CDAD remained relatively stable (2–3 cases per 1000 discharges annually). Then, a significant decrease in the incidence occurred, from 2.09 cases per 1000 discharges (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.71–2.47) in 1998 to 0.87 cases per 1000 discharges (95% CI, 0.63–1.11) in 1999 (P >.0001); this decrease persisted into 2000. A decrease in third-generation cephalosporin use occurred during the period of the study because of changes in the prescribing policy. These findings suggest that a reduction in the use of third-generation cephalosporins can reduce the occurrence of CDAD.

Journal Article.  3829 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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