Journal Article

Antimicrobial Use and Serotype Distribution of Nasopharyngeal <i>Streptococcus pneumoniae</i> Isolates Recovered from Greek Children Younger than 2 Years Old

George A. Syrogiannopoulos, George D. Katopodis, Ioanna N. Grivea and Nicholas G. Beratis

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 35, issue 10, pages 1174-1182
Published in print November 2002 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online November 2002 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/343824
Antimicrobial Use and Serotype Distribution of Nasopharyngeal Streptococcus pneumoniae Isolates Recovered from Greek Children Younger than 2 Years Old

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The serotype distribution of 781 nasopharyngeal pneumococcal isolates recovered from 2448 unselected children aged 2–23 months was studied. Only 3.9% of the children for whom cultures were performed attended day care centers. The proportions of pneumococcal isolates that belonged to serotypes related to the 7-, 9- and 11-valent conjugate pneumococcal vaccine were 65%, 66%, and 70%, respectively. The pneumococcal carriage rate among untreated children was 34%; the rates among children treated with antibiotics during the periods 1–30 or 31–60 days before the time of nasopharyngeal sampling were 25% and 36%, respectively. There was a significant positive association between antimicrobial use and carriage of antibiotic-resistant pneumococci, which belonged mainly to vaccine-related serotypes. The proportion of isolates that belonged to vaccine-related serotypes in untreated carriers was 72%; however, the proportions in carriers treated 1–30 days or 31–60 days before sampling were 66% and 56%, respectively. In the nasopharynx, antimicrobial use selects for antibiotic-resistant pneumococci, mainly of vaccine-related serotypes, whereas it may promote an increase in the frequency of colonization with nonvaccine serotypes.

Journal Article.  5052 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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