Journal Article

Lipodystrophy in a Cohort of Human Immunodeficiency Virus—Infected Asian Patients: Prevalence, Associated Factors, and Psychological Impact

Nicholas I. Paton, Arul Earnest, Yau Ming Ng, Fatimah Karim and Jamila Aboulhab

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 35, issue 10, pages 1244-1249
Published in print November 2002 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online November 2002 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/344055
Lipodystrophy in a Cohort of Human Immunodeficiency Virus—Infected Asian Patients: Prevalence, Associated Factors, and Psychological Impact

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We investigated the prevalence of and factors associated with lipodystrophy in a cohort of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients in Singapore. A standardized questionnaire was administered to 410 consecutive patients (mainly Chinese men), and blood samples were obtained for metabolic measurements for fasting patients. Peripheral fat loss was reported by 46% of subjects, central fat gain was reported by 32%, and 8% of patients overall had a mixed clinical presentation. Levels of total cholesterol, triglycerides, glucose, and lactate were elevated in 19%, 38%, 12%, and 16% of patients, respectively. A mixture of drug-related and non-drug-related factors was associated with these changes. The body-shape changes affected the mood of 36% of patients and the work and/or social activity of 23% of patients, but only <1% of affected subjects reported a desire to stop receipt of antiretroviral therapy because of these changes. We conclude that the prevalence of and factors associated with body-shape changes and metabolic abnormalities in HIV-infected Asian patients are similar to those reported for Western cohorts, but the changes did not appear to have a major psychosocial impact on this patient population.

Journal Article.  3504 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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