Journal Article

Efficacy of Induction Therapy with High-Dose Interferon for Patients with Hemophilia and Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Hepatitis C Virus Coinfection

Hideji Hanabusa

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 35, issue 12, pages 1527-1533
Published in print December 2002 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online December 2002 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/344755
Efficacy of Induction Therapy with High-Dose Interferon for Patients with Hemophilia and Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Hepatitis C Virus Coinfection

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To evaluate the efficacy of high-dose interferon (IFN) on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, 15 HIV-positive patients and 15 age-matched HIV-negative patients with hemophilia were treated with 9 million units (MU) of IFN-α2a daily for 2 weeks, followed by 9 MU of IFN-α2a 3 times/week for a further 22 weeks. At week 2, HIV RNA levels decreased from 7410 ± 2190 to 320 ± 130 copies/mL, and HCV RNA levels decreased from 390 × 103 ± 80 × 103 to 70 × 103 ± 30 × 103 copies/mL in the HIV-positive group and from 300 × 103 ± 80 × 103 to 10 × 103 ± 10 × 103 copies/mL in the HIV-negative group. HCV RNA was undetectable after treatment in 4 of 12 HIV-positive and 6 of 15 HIV-negative patients. IFN therapy was discontinued because of adverse effects in 3 HIV-positive patients. Induction therapy and the dose of IFN should be evaluated in combination therapy with IFN and ribavirin.

Journal Article.  4051 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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