Journal Article

Natural History of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Disease in Southern India

N. Kumarasamy, Suniti Solomon, Timothy P. Flanigan, R. Hemalatha, S. P. Thyagarajan and Kenneth H. Mayer

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 36, issue 1, pages 79-85
Published in print January 2003 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online January 2003 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/344756
Natural History of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Disease in Southern India

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There are few reports of the natural history of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection from Asia. In a retrospective analysis of 594 patients (72.9% male; baseline CD4 cell count, 216 cells/μL) receiving care at YRG Center for AIDS Research and Education, a tertiary HIV referral center in southern India, the mean duration of survival from serodiagnosis was 92 months. Ninety-three percent of the patients acquired infection through heterosexual contact. The most common acquired immune deficiency syndrome–defining illnesses were pulmonary tuberculosis (49%; median duration of survival, 45 months), Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (6%; median duration of survival, 24 months), cryptococcal meningitis (5%; median duration of survival, 22 months), and central nervous system toxoplasmosis (3%; median duration of survival, 28 months). Persons with a CD4 lymphocyte count of <200 cells/μL were 19 times (95% confidence interval [CI], 5.56–64.77) more likely to die than were those with CD4 cell count of >350 cells/μL. Patients who had ⩾1 opportunistic infection were 2.6 times more likely to die (95% CI, 0.95–7.09) than were those who did not have an opportunistic infection. Antiretroviral therapy for patients with low CD4 lymphocyte counts improved the odds of survival (odds ratio, 5.37; 95% CI, 1.82–15.83).

Journal Article.  3533 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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