Journal Article

Amputation-Sparing Treatment by Nature: “Surgical” Maggots Revisited

G. N. Jukema, A. G. Menon, A. T. Bernards, P. Steenvoorde, A. Taheri Rastegar and J. T. van Dissel

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 35, issue 12, pages 1566-1571
Published in print December 2002 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online December 2002 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/344904
Amputation-Sparing Treatment by Nature: “Surgical” Maggots Revisited

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Maggots were used as adjunct treatment for infected wounds that showed no response to the classical approach of wound debridement and antibiotic therapy. We summarize findings for 11 patients with necrotic wounds who received treatment with “surgical” maggots (100–2900 applied in 3–10 changes of dressing) for 11–34 days, which apparently aided in tissue remodeling and cure, and describe 2 typical patients in detail.

Journal Article.  1975 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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