Journal Article

High Rate of Invasive Fungal Infections Following Nonmyeloablative Allogeneic Transplantation

Elisabeth A. Hagen, Hillary Stern, David Porter, Kathleen Duffy, Karen Foley, Selina Luger, Stephen J. Schuster, Edward A. Stadtmauer and Mindy G. Schuster

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 36, issue 1, pages 9-15
Published in print January 2003 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online January 2003 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/344906
High Rate of Invasive Fungal Infections Following Nonmyeloablative Allogeneic Transplantation

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Immunology
  • Public Health and Epidemiology
  • Microbiology

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

Nonmyeloablative allogeneic transplantation is an emerging therapy for hematologic and solid malignancies and potentially offers patients reduced transplant-related toxicity. Data regarding infectious complications of these protocols are limited, but early studies have demonstrated little infectious morbidity, particularly low rates of invasive fungal infections (IFIs). In the present study, 31 consecutive cases of nonmyeloablative transplantation were reviewed over a 2.5-year period, with a specific focus on infectious complications. Twenty-six patients (84%) had at least 1 significant infection during the year after transplantation, and infection-related mortality was 37%. Cytomegalovirus end-organ disease was diagnosed in 3 patients (10%). Ten patients (32%) were given the diagnosis of IFI; 7 (23%) met criteria for proven IFI. Fungal-related mortality was 80% within the group of patients with IFI and accounted for a significant portion of the overall mortality in the study. Severe graft-versus-host disease, high-dose corticosteroid use, recurrent neutropenia, and relapsed or refractory disease were factors associated with development of IFI.

Journal Article.  3571 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.