Journal Article

Greater Effect of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy on Survival in People Aged ⩾50 Years Compared with Younger People in an Urban Observational Cohort

John L. Perez and Richard D. Moore

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 36, issue 2, pages 212-218
Published in print January 2003 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online January 2003 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/345669
Greater Effect of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy on Survival in People Aged ⩾50 Years Compared with Younger People in an Urban Observational Cohort

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Although human immunodeficiency virus—infected people aged ⩾50 years have a blunted CD4 cell recovery when receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), there are few data on mortality. Mortality rates were studied for 253 individuals aged ⩾50 years and a younger group of 535 people in a retrospective cohort; for untreated persons in each age group, the proportions surviving at 3 years were 83% and 70% (P <.01), respectively. No significant difference in the survival rate was found between the older (83%) and younger (89%) patients who received HAART (P =.29). The hazard ratio for death in the older untreated group was 2.4 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.4–3.9) when exposed to HAART. However, compared with older untreated patients, the hazard ratio for death decreased to 0.28 (95% CI, 0.15–0.52) for treated older adults. The effect of HAART substantially improves the survival rate for older individuals and supports the importance of treatment in this group.

Journal Article.  3989 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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