Journal Article

Risk of Methicillin-Resistant <i>Staphylococcus aureus</i> Infection after Previous Infection or Colonization

Susan S. Huang and Richard Platt

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 36, issue 3, pages 281-285
Published in print February 2003 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online February 2003 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/345955
Risk of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Infection after Previous Infection or Colonization

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Studies evaluating the risk of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)–associated sequelae in colonized or infected inpatients have not extended follow-up into the period after discharge from the hospital. We determined the 18-month risk of MRSA infection among 209 adult patients newly identified as harboring MRSA. Twenty-nine percent of patients (60 patients) developed subsequent MRSA infections (90 infections). These infections were often severe. Twenty-eight percent of infections (25 of 90) involved bacteremia, and 56% (50 of 90) involved pneumonia, soft tissue infection, osteomyelitis, or septic arthritis. Eighty percent of patients (48 of 60) with subsequent MRSA infection developed the infection at a new site, and 49% of new MRSA infections (44 of 90) first became manifest after discharge from the hospital. Accurate assessment of the risk of MRSA-associated sequelae requires prolonged follow-up after discharge.

Journal Article.  2981 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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