Journal Article

Epidemiological and Microbiological Characterization of Infections Caused by <i>Staphylococcus aureus</i> with Reduced Susceptibility to Vancomycin, United States, 1997–2001

Scott K. Fridkin, Jeff Hageman, Linda K. McDougal, Jasmine Mohammed, William R. Jarvis, Trish M. Perl and Fred C. Tenover

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 36, issue 4, pages 429-439
Published in print February 2003 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online February 2003 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/346207
Epidemiological and Microbiological Characterization of Infections Caused by Staphylococcus aureus with Reduced Susceptibility to Vancomycin, United States, 1997–2001

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Immunology
  • Public Health and Epidemiology
  • Microbiology

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

Infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus with reduced vancomycin susceptibility (SA-RVS; minimum inhibitory concentration [MIC], ≥4 μg/mL), including vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (VISA; MIC, 8 μg/mL), are a new clinical and public health dilemma. Prospective surveillance and a nested case-control study of patients in the United States infected with SA-RVS was conduced from March 1999 through December 2000. Control patients were persons infected with oxacillin-resistant S. aureus (MIC of vancomycin, <2 μg/mL). Among 19 case patients, 4 infections were due to VISA and 15 were due to non-VISA SA-RVS. Case patients with and those without VISA infection had similar clinical presentations and outcomes; the overall attributable mortality rate was 63%. Isolates recovered from case patients had heterogeneous pulsed-field gel electrophoresis banding patterns, regardless of the MIC of vancomycin. Neither dialysis nor chronic renal failure were predictive of case status compared with control status. Independent risk factors for being a case patient included antecedent vancomycin use and prior oxacillin-resistant S. aureus infection 2 or 3 months before the current infection.

Journal Article.  4465 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.