Journal Article

Assessment of Nutritional Status, Body Composition, and Human Immunodeficiency Virus—Associated Morphologic Changes

Tamsin A. Knox, Melissa Zafonte-Sanders, Cade Fields-Gardner, Karol Moen, Diana Johansen and Nicholas Paton

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 36, issue Supplement_2, pages S63-S68
Published in print April 2003 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online April 2003 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/367560
Assessment of Nutritional Status, Body Composition, and Human Immunodeficiency Virus—Associated Morphologic Changes

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Nutritional status should be assessed at regular intervals as part of management of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. The simplest approach to assessment is serial weight measurement. A comprehensive nutritional assessment includes (1) anthropometric measurements of body composition; (2) biochemical measurements of serum protein, micronutrients, and metabolic parameters; (3) clinical assessment of altered nutritional requirements and social or psychological issues that may preclude adequate intake; and (4) measurement of dietary intake. Techniques for measuring body composition of fat and lean body mass include anthropometry and bioelectric impedance analysis. Other techniques, including dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), hydrodensitometry, total body potassium measurement, and cross-sectional computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging are available in research centers. Anthropometry, including waist-hip ratios, regional DXA, and cross-sectional imaging, is best for detecting morphologic changes associated with fat redistribution syndrome. Nutritional assessment and intervention in children with HIV can help to prevent stunted growth and development.

Journal Article.  4097 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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