Journal Article

Progression of Chronic Hepatitis C to Liver Fibrosis and Cirrhosis in Patients Coinfected with Hepatitis C Virus and Human Immunodeficiency Virus

Carmen Martinez Sierra, Ana Arizcorreta, Fernando Dí;az, Rafael Roldá, Leopoldo Martí;n-Herrera, Eugenio Pérez-Guzmán and Girón-González JoséA.

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 36, issue 4, pages 491-498
Published in print February 2003 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online February 2003 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/367643
Progression of Chronic Hepatitis C to Liver Fibrosis and Cirrhosis in Patients Coinfected with Hepatitis C Virus and Human Immunodeficiency Virus

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To evaluate the factors associated with the evolution of chronic hepatitis C in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)—infected patients, a cross-sectional analysis of 41 HIV-infected patients with chronic hepatitis C (known as “HIV-HCV [hepatitis C virus]—coinfected patients”) and a control group of patients with chronic hepatitis C who did not have HIV infection (known as “non-HIV-infected patients”) was performed. The association of histological variables with demographic parameters, HCV load and genotype, HIV load, CD4+ T cell count, and response to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) was evaluated. HIV-HCV—coinfected patients showed a significantly higher HCV load, more-advanced fibrosis, and a higher liver fibrosis progression rate (FPR) than did non—HIV-infected patients. A high HCV load and a low CD4+ T cell count were associated with a higher FPR. The immune response induced by HAART did not influence this progression. In conclusion, HIV-HCV—infected patients, mainly such patients with a high HCV load and an immunodepressed state, have a higher FPR. An independent effect of the immune response to HAART was not evident.

Journal Article.  4689 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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