Journal Article

Discontinuation of Secondary Prophylaxis for <i>Pneumocystis carinii</i> Pneumonia in Human Immunodeficiency Virus—Infected Patients: A Randomized Trial by the CIOP Study Group

Cristina Mussini, Patrizio Pezzotti, Andrea Antinori, Vanni Borghi, Antonella d'Arminio Monforte, Alessandra Govoni, Andrea De Luca, Adriana Ammassari, Nicola Mongiardo, Maria Chiara Cerri, Andrea Bedini, Cristina Beltrami, Maria Alessandra Ursitti, Teresa Bini, Andrea Cossarizza and Roberto Esposito

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 36, issue 5, pages 645-651
Published in print March 2003 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online March 2003 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/367659
Discontinuation of Secondary Prophylaxis for Pneumocystis carinii Pneumonia in Human Immunodeficiency Virus—Infected Patients: A Randomized Trial by the CIOP Study Group

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To evaluate whether bacterial vaginosis predicts the acquisition of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), we studied 255 nonpregnant female subjects aged 15–30 who reported recent sexual contact with a male partner in whom either gonococcal or chlamydial urethritis or nongonococcal urethritis was diagnosed. Compared to subjects with normal vaginal flora, subjects with bacterial vaginosis were more likely to test positive for Neisseria gonorrhoeae (odds ratio [OR], 4.1; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.7–9.7) and Chlamydia trachomatis (OR, 3.4; 95% CI, 1.5–7.8). Subjects colonized vaginally by hydrogen peroxide–producing lactobacilli were less likely to receive a diagnosis of chlamydial infection or gonorrhea than subjects without such lactobacilli. Bacterial vaginosis was a strong predictor of gonorrhea and chlamydial infection among subjects who reported recent exposure to a male partner with urethritis. These data support the importance of vaginal flora in the defense against STD acquisition.

Journal Article.  3957 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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