Journal Article

<i>Chlamydia</i> Antibody Response in Healthy Volunteers Immunized with Nonchlamydial Antigens: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study

Stine Johnsen, Paul L. Andersen, Gerold Stanek, Gunna Christiansen, Svend Birkelund, Lene M. Berthelsen and Lars Østergaard

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 36, issue 5, pages 586-591
Published in print March 2003 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online March 2003 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/367663
Chlamydia Antibody Response in Healthy Volunteers Immunized with Nonchlamydial Antigens: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study

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Serological analysis is often used for the diagnosis of chlamydial infections. However, an increase in Chlamydia antibodies has been reported in patients with parvovirus and Mycoplasma infections. Whether this antibody response is the result of dual infection or nonchlamydial antigen stimulation is unknown. In a randomized study, 48 healthy volunteers either were immunized against yellow fever, polio, diphtheria, and tetanus (the group receiving intervention with nonchlamydial antigen) or received saline injections (the placebo group). The change in antibody levels was compared between the 2 groups. The Chlamydia recombinant lipopolysaccharide enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (Medac) showed an increase in the antibody titer in the intervention group, compared with that in the control group (for immunoglobulin M, P =.004; for immunoglobulin A, P =.038; and for immunoglobulin G, P =.056), but no differences between study groups was found when the C. pneumoniae enzyme immunoassay (EIA; ThermoLabsystems), the C. pneumoniae EIA (Medac), and the microimmunofluorescence test (MRL) were used. An increase in antibodies to Chlamydia organisms can be measured after exposure to nonchlamydial antigens, depending on the test used.

Journal Article.  3641 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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