Journal Article

Risk Factors for Antibiotic-Resistant Infection and Treatment Outcomes among Hospitalized Patients Transferred from Long-Term Care Facilities: Does Antimicrobial Choice Make a Difference?

E. Toubes, K. Singh, D. Yin, R. Lyu, N. Glick, L. Russell, S. Mohapatra, N. Saghal, R. A. Weinstein and G. Trenholme

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 36, issue 6, pages 724-730
Published in print March 2003 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online March 2003 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/368081
Risk Factors for Antibiotic-Resistant Infection and Treatment Outcomes among Hospitalized Patients Transferred from Long-Term Care Facilities: Does Antimicrobial Choice Make a Difference?

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A prospective observational study of 153 patients transferred from long-term care facilities and admitted to acute-care hospitals who had microbiologically confirmed infections was undertaken to determine the risk factors, outcomes, and resource use associated with isolation of antibiotic-resistant bacteria (ARB). Eighty patients (52%) were infected with ARB. In multivariable logistic analysis, the presence of a feeding tube (odds ratio, 3.0) or polymicrobial infection (odds ratio, 4.6) was associated with isolation of ARB. Forty-nine percent of patients infected with ARB received an initial antibiotic regimen to which their isolate was not susceptible. Fifty-one percent of all patients had a change in their antibiotic regimen during their hospital course. For these patients, length of stay, number of days of antibiotic therapy, and cost of hospitalization were significantly higher. However, neither infection with ARB nor appropriateness of initial treatment regimen was significantly related to outcome or resource use.

Journal Article.  4095 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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