Journal Article

Effect of Providing Vitamin Supplements to Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected, Lactating Mothers on the Child's Morbidity and CD4<sup>+</sup> Cell Counts

Wafaie W. Fawzi, Gernard I. Msamanga, Ruilan Wei, Donna Spiegelman, Gretchen Antelman, Eduardo Villamor, Karim Manji and David Hunter

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 36, issue 8, pages 1053-1062
Published in print April 2003 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online April 2003 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/374223
Effect of Providing Vitamin Supplements to Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected, Lactating Mothers on the Child's Morbidity and CD4+ Cell Counts

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A total of 1078 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1-infected women from Tanzania were randomized in a placebo-controlled trial using a factorial design to examine the effects of supplementation with vitamin A (preformed vitamin A and beta carotene) and/or multivitamins (vitamins B, C, and E). Supplements were given during pregnancy and lactation. Children of women in the multivitamin arms had a significantly lower risk of diarrhea than did those in the no-multivitamin arm (P = .03). The mean CD4+ cell count was 151 cells/μL higher among children in the multivitamin arms than among those in the no-multivitamin arm (P = .0006). HIV-positive children experienced a benefit apparently similar to that in HIV-negative children (P = .34, by test for interaction). Maternal receipt of vitamin A significantly reduced the risk that the child would have cough with a rapid respiratory rate, a proxy for pneumonia (P = .03), but receipt of vitamin A had no effect on diarrhea or CD4+ cell count. Provision of multivitamin supplements (including those with vitamins B, C, and E) to HIV-infected, lactating women may be a low-cost intervention to improve their children's health.

Journal Article.  5892 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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