Journal Article

Prosthetic Joint Infections: Bane of Orthopedists, Challenge for Infectious Disease Specialists

Joseph R. Lentino

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 36, issue 9, pages 1157-1161
Published in print May 2003 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online May 2003 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/374554
Prosthetic Joint Infections: Bane of Orthopedists, Challenge for Infectious Disease Specialists

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Prosthetic joint infections (PJIs) occur in ∼1.5%–2.5% of all primary hip or knee arthroplasties. The mortality rate attributed to PJIs may be as high as 2.5%. Substantial morbidity is associated with a loss of mobility, although this is temporary. The costs associated with a single episode of PJI are ∼$50,000 per episode, exclusive of lost wages. Risk factors that increase the occurrence of PJI include revision arthroplasty, time in the operating room, postoperative surgical site infection, and malignancy. Pain is the most consistent symptom. Staphylococcus species are the most common organisms isolated from PJI sites. Two-stage revision is superior to single-stage revision or to debridement with prosthesis retention. Long-term antibiotic suppression and/or arthrodesis are useful for patients too frail to undergo extensive surgery. Using an optimal approach, recurrent infection occurs in <10% of previously infected joints.

Journal Article.  3423 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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