Journal Article

<i>Streptococcus pneumoniae</i> Bacteremia: Duration of Previous Antibiotic Use and Association with Penicillin Resistance

Jörg J. Ruhe and Rodrigo Hasbun

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 36, issue 9, pages 1132-1138
Published in print May 2003 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online May 2003 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1086/374556
Streptococcus pneumoniae Bacteremia: Duration of Previous Antibiotic Use and Association with Penicillin Resistance

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Previous antibiotic exposure is one of the most important predictors for acquisition of penicillin-nonsusceptible Streptococcus pneumoniae (PNSP) infection. To determine the impact of duration of exposure to different antibiotic classes, a study of 303 patients with S. pneumoniae bacteremia was undertaken. Ninety-eight cases of bacteremia (32%) were caused by a penicillin-nonsusceptible isolate. Bivariate analysis revealed that use of β-lactams, sulfonamides, and macrolides within the last 1 and 6 months before presentation was associated with PNSP bacteremia (P < .05). Fluoroquinolone consumption was not related to bacteremia due to PNSP (P > .1). Both short- and long-term β-lactam use significantly increased the risk for PNSP infection. Logistic regression analysis revealed that use of β-lactams and macrolides in the 6 months before the first positive blood culture result were independent risk factors (P < .05). Risk for acquiring PNSP infection depends on both the class of antibiotic to which the patient was exposed and the duration of therapy.

Journal Article.  3579 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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