Journal Article

Voriconazole Treatment for Less-Common, Emerging, or Refractory Fungal Infections

John R. Perfect, Kieren A. Marr, Thomas J. Walsh, Richard N. Greenberg, Bertrand DuPont, Juliàn de la Torre-Cisneros, Gudrun Just-Nübling, Haran T Schlamm, Irja Lutsar, Ana Espinel-Ingroff and Elizabeth Johnson

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 36, issue 9, pages 1122-1131
Published in print May 2003 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online May 2003 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/374557
Voriconazole Treatment for Less-Common, Emerging, or Refractory Fungal Infections

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Treatments for invasive fungal infections remain unsatisfactory. We evaluated the efficacy, tolerability, and safety of voriconazole as salvage treatment for 273 patients with refractory and intolerant-to-treatment fungal infections and as primary treatment for 28 patients with infections for which there is no approved therapy. Voriconazole was associated with satisfactory global responses in 50% of the overall cohort; specifically, successful outcomes were observed in 47% of patients whose infections failed to respond to previous antifungal therapy and in 68% of patients whose infections have no approved antifungal therapy. In this population at high risk for treatment failure, the efficacy rates for voriconazole were 43.7% for aspergillosis, 57.5% for candidiasis, 38.9% for cryptococcosis, 45.5% for fusariosis, and 30% for scedosporiosis. Voriconazole was well tolerated, and treatment-related discontinuations of therapy or dose reductions occurred for <10% of patients. Voriconazole is an effective and well-tolerated treatment for refractory or less-common invasive fungal infections.

Journal Article.  5963 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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