Journal Article

Effect of Physician Specialty on Counseling Practices and Medical Referral Patterns among Physicians Caring for Disadvantaged Human Immunodeficiency Virus—Infected Populations

W. A. Duffus, M. Barragan, L. Metsch, C. S. Krawczyk, A. M. Loughlin, L. I. Gardner, P. Anderson Mahoney, G. Dickinson and C. del Rio

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 36, issue 12, pages 1577-1584
Published in print June 2003 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online June 2003 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/375070
Effect of Physician Specialty on Counseling Practices and Medical Referral Patterns among Physicians Caring for Disadvantaged Human Immunodeficiency Virus—Infected Populations

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Data regarding the care and management of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)—infected patients provided by infectious diseases (ID)–trained physicians, compared with data for care and management provided by other specialists, are limited. Here, we report results of a self-administered survey sent to 317 physicians (response rate, 76%) in 4 metropolitan areas of the United States who were identified as providing care to disadvantaged HIV-infected patients. ID-trained physicians who responded that they strongly agreed or somewhat agreed that they had enough time to care for their HIV-infected patients were more likely than were non-ID–trained physicians to provide therapy-adherence counseling. Physicians with ≤50 patients in care and ID-trained physicians were less likely to always discuss condom use and risk reduction for HIV transmission. Factors significantly associated with referring rather than treating HIV-infected patients with hypertension or diabetes included having >50 patients in care, being an ID-trained physician, and practicing in a private practice. These results suggest the need for targeted physician training on the importance of HIV transmission prevention counseling, increasing the duration of patient visits, and improving strategies for generalist-specialist comanagement of HIV-infected patients.

Journal Article.  3444 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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