Journal Article

Exercise and Vitamin E Intake Are Independently Associated with Metabolic Abnormalities in Human Immunodeficiency Virus—Positive Subjects: A Cross-Sectional Study

Alina Gavrila, Sotirios Tsiodras, John Doweiko, G. Sonia Nagy, Kimberly Brodovicz, William Hsu, Adolf W. Karchmer and Christos S. Mantzoros

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 36, issue 12, pages 1593-1601
Published in print June 2003 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online June 2003 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/375225
Exercise and Vitamin E Intake Are Independently Associated with Metabolic Abnormalities in Human Immunodeficiency Virus—Positive Subjects: A Cross-Sectional Study

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We investigated the relationship among habitual exercise, diet, and the presence of metabolic abnormalities (body fat redistribution, dyslipidemia, and insulin resistance) in a cross-sectional study of 120 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected subjects with use of bivariate and multivariate regression-analysis models. Total and aerobic exercise were significantly and negatively associated with fasting plasma triglyceride levels in the entire sample and in the fat redistribution group. Inverse associations between total or aerobic exercise and insulin resistance were suggestive but did not achieve statistical significance. Diastolic blood pressure was significantly and inversely associated with supplemental or total but not habitual dietary intake of vitamin E. In conclusion, exercise and vitamin E intake were independently and negatively associated with several phenotypic manifestations of HIV-associated metabolic syndrome, whereas other macro- or micronutrients did not have comparable significance.

Journal Article.  5011 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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